Lo status dello schiavo per l’islam: cenni storici, questioni terminologiche e legali

Autori

  • Letizia Lombezzi Università per Stranieri di Perugia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.13130/2035-7680/11325

Parole chiave:

Slaves and Islam, slave soldiers, slavery Arab countries

Abstract

Arabic terms and translations for “slaves” – either male or female − clearly sum up the functions assigned to them: male slaves are mostly servants, military personnel or guardians, whereas the females areusually maids or musicians-prostitutes. Historically, slavery has been allowed and practiced since the beginning of the Islamic era. In fact, the Koran regulates some aspects of it, especially related to moral issues or relationships between men and women. The Islamic Law too, and the Maliki school in particular, mentions legal cases concerning the sale of slaves (hence, it must have been aquite common business). Additionally, the events that took place in Iraq and Egypt between the 9th and 13th century prove that the power in charge made use of slaves, especially for filling specific offices in the military field. It is exactly from this sector that a new caste first emerged, and then became gradually stronger. It initially defended and later inherited the management of the Arab-Islamic empire

Biografia autore

Letizia Lombezzi, Università per Stranieri di Perugia

Letizia Lombezzi è dottore di ricerca in Dialettologia araba ed insegna a contratto all’Università per Stranieri di Perugia. I suoi interessi sono centrati sull’insegnamento dell’arabo, standard e dialettale, nonché su temi classici di cultura e civiltà islamica, ai fini di loro possibili riletture innescate da eventi contemporanei. Con Altre Modernità ha già pubblicato “The Arabic Language in Israel :official language, mothertongue, foreign language. Teaching, dissemination and competence” nel nr. 02/2018.

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Pubblicato

2019-02-27

Come citare

Lombezzi, Letizia. 2019. «Lo Status Dello Schiavo Per l’islam: Cenni Storici, Questioni Terminologiche E Legali». Altre Modernità, febbraio, 57-72. https://doi.org/10.13130/2035-7680/11325.